All about Butternut Squash

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This starchy bright orange veg is higher in carbs than vegetables like leafy greens but they make a nutritious alternative to potatoes, and unlike potatoes, squash counts towards your 5-a-day fruit and veg intake. You can eat the skin of this vibrant veg, helping to reduce food waste.

What’s in it?

  • Naturally rich in vitamin A in the form of beta carotene, which is needed for normal functioning of the immune system
  • A source of vitamin C, a great winter vitamin as it contributes to normal functioning of the immune system as well as reduction of tiredness and fatigue

What to do with it?

  1. Simple Soup: Boil diced butternut squash and a handful of red lentils in a pan of vegetable stock. Blitz in a blender. Sauté onions and garlic in olive oil, mix with the blended vegetables, season and stir in a good handful of freshly chopped parsley. Top with toasted pitta strip croutons.
  2. Sweet chilli mash boats: Cut the squash lengthways in half and microwave till soft and tender. Discard the seeds. Scoop out the soft flesh and mix in a bowl with sweet chilli sauce, chopped dill and a little salt. Put the mash back into the “boats” and enjoy with the softened tasty skin. Lovely with a dollop of thick Greek yogurt!
  3. Vegan squash curry: Sauté onions, crushed garlic and ginger in rapeseed oil. Stir in some crushed tomatoes, curry powder, a sprinkling of turmeric and red chilli flakes. Add chopped butternut squash pieces and coconut milk; cover and cook for about 20 minutes. Stir in some fresh spinach leaves once cooked, adjust seasoning if needed, and serve with aromatic basmati rice.

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